Review: Robert Oster Eucalyptus Leaf


Robert Oster Eucalyptus Leaf

Today I’m reviewing Robert Oster Signature Inks Eucalyptus green. It’s a deep green color with a very subtle red undertone. If you’re a green ink lover, this ink is pretty easy to love. At first glance, it reminded me of one of my favorite green inks, De Atramentis Jane Austen, but a closer look shows some differences between the two:

Robert Oster Eucalyptus Leaf

The red undertone of Eucalyptus Leaf (bottom line) gives it a warmer tone. It has more shading, and the light green component of its shading looks beautifully translucent. Of course, shading will depend on the pen that you use as well as paper quality, YMMV.

Eucalyptus Leaf is a wet-flowing ink, and it takes around 20-25 seconds to dry (medium nib, Tomoe River paper). I like that it feels wet but doesn’t bleed and isn’t too wet that it doesn’t show off the shading. It’s just wet enough for the nib to feel like it’s gliding on paper. It stays vibrant even after it dries, which is something I love about Robert Oster inks. This green ink is nicely saturated and is suitable for everyday writing. It’s not water resistant, but if you use it for pen and wash drawings (like the weird-looking Master Oogwey in the writing sample sheet above), it spreads out nicely and shows the red components of the ink.

Here are a few close ups of the writing sample:

Robert Oster Eucalyptus Leaf

Robert Oster Eucalyptus Leaf

Robert Oster Eucalyptus Leaf

Robert Oster Eucalyptus Leaf

Robert Oster Eucalyptus Leaf

Robert Oster Signature Inks are exclusively distributed in the Philippines by Everything Calligraphy.

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Review: Robert Oster River of Fire


Robert Oster River of Fire

Here’s another Robert Oster ink from a batch of samples sent by the nice people of Everything Calligraphy. It’s called River of Fire, and at first I was surprised because I was expecting something blue, then I realized that the name is “River”, not “Sea” or “Ocean”. It’s a deep, rich, forest green color, sometimes leaning towards blue green, and a nice red sheen. It’s quite an attractive color, especially in person. It reminded me of Sailor Tokiwa Matsu, except the base color is a bit lighter than Tokiwa’s which is sometimes hard to distinguish from black when used with wet nibs because of how dark a shade of green it is. This ink is highly saturated green, but it not too dark as to make it an ambiguous shade.

Robert Oster River of Fire

As is the case with many dark-colored inks, the shading is not too expressive, though there’s definitely some shading there. What’s more noticeable is the red sheen. It really gives the color a nice contrast. That dark but shimmery halo that makes the lines almost luminous under certain kinds of light.

I would put the flow of this ink at a hair over medium with a stub nib. I’m happy I decided to use a stub nib for this review because the personality of this ink really shone through with a wet, stubby writer. Like the other Robert Oster inks I tried, it has a very nice flow that is a touch over moderate without being watery. It dries to a darker shade that is still vibrant and really eye-catching, with the red halo becoming more pronounced. Under natural light, it makes the ink looks like its edges are on fire.

The ink isn’t water proof. It’s not very water-resistant as well, so people who like to do ink and wash artworks will certainly enjoy this aspect of the ink’s characteristics.

Here are a few close ups of the writing sample on Tomoe River paper:

Robert Oster River of Fire

Robert Oster River of Fire

Robert Oster River of Fire

Robert Oster River of Fire

Robert Oster River of Fire

Robert Oster River of Fire

Overall, I enjoyed trying this ink out! The flow is pleasantly wet, the hue is gorgeous, and the red sheen gives it that wonderful look on paper.

Robert Oster inks are exclusively distributed in the Philippines by Everything Calligraphy.

Elias Pen and Ink Journal


Here is something pen and ink fans will find truly interesting and delightful. I used to keep a software database of pens, but I haven’t been very good with keeping it updated, until I eventually just forgot about it. Here’s a truly analog way to document an analog hobby.

Elias Pen and Ink Journal

Everything Calligraphy came up with its very own pen and ink journal! It’s soft-bound and uses their own 90GSM ivory colored paper that’s fountain pen, brush pen, and pointed pen friendly. Hardcore, man.

Elias Pen and Ink Journal

The theme of Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterismo is the thread that runs through the different sections of the notebook, from cover to cover. When I first held the journal in my hand, it really felt like something that you can keep as a “pen memoir”, and I felt sorry I wasn’t able to document the old pens that I had already sold, or the inks that I already used up.

Elias Pen and Ink Journal

There is a simple Elias logo on the binding, and the spine feels nice and tight. It’s bound securely, though it’s not going to lay flat by itself. It’s not difficult to write in or leaf through, though. The journal is bound by plain white, textured card paper, and there’s a translucent, waxy paper that wraps around it. I really like the illustration used in that decorative wrap. It’s printed neatly and is really like a slice of a story.

Elias Pen and Ink Journal

It also smells good. Mmmmm. Yum. The journal has several sections. I’ll show each section in this review.

Elias Pen and Ink Journal

The first section is the Pen Journal section. It has space for every kind of information useful in a pen. Like brand, model, nib size, rating systems, etc. The opposite page is dedicated entirely to writing samples, or (like what I did) a review of the pen. You can put anything! How you got the pen, its little back story, anything that helps you either catalog the pen’s specifications or document its history. You can even stick a printed photo of the pen, if you like. You can get as creative as you want, there’s space for it!

Elias Pen and Ink Journal

The next section is the Ink Journal. It has all the pertinent information you need to catalog your ink. From the cost, to the properties (shading, sheen drying time, flow), a portion for swabs and water resistance tests, and your comments. Here’s a photo of my first ink journal page, documenting one of my new favorite inks, Kyo Iro Moonlight of Higashiyama. It’s a straightforward way to catalog your ink collection. The paper being Elias paper, it shows off any shading and sheen so well. The paper also holds up very well to my water resistance test.

Elias Pen and Ink Journal

I had to chuckle a little at the next section, the Future Pen and Inks. It’s like a wishlist. You can note down pens and inks that caught your attention and would like to purchase in the future. This is a list you can really have fun ticking items off of.

Elias Pen and Ink Journal

Elias Pen and Ink Journal

The next section contains coloring sheets. Line drawings of scenes and excerpts from Noli and El Fili. It adds a really Pinoy flair to the entire thing. I like how the line drawings are made. They have a folk-artsy feel to them. The pages remind me of these traditional Japanese line drawings before anime became popular. There’s a story going on in each drawing and it really captured that overall theme of the journal. The person who drew them is Julz Riddle (a Filipino teacher and artist). Her Instagram account is @hulyariddle. Here are a couple of samples from the journal.

Elias Pen and Ink Journal

Elias Pen and Ink Journal

Those who are into practicing calligraphy will love the next section.

Elias Pen and Ink Journal

Elias Pen and Ink Journal

These pages with guide lines can help you achieve consistent strokes. Even if you only want to improve your handwriting by practicing writing in script, this can be really helpful.

The remaining pages are blank sheets, doodle pages. If you look at the back of every single journal I have, the last pages are basically doodle pages. Figure eights, “the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog”, baybayin scribbles, anything! A blank space to doodle and free the mind. How wonderful that there’s a space in this journal for doodling.

Overall, I don’t think I’ve come across a journal that’s exactly like this, and with a very Filipino flair. It’s really a great way to celebrate your fascination with pens and inks (and doodling!). I’m glad that Everything Calligraphy came up with something so special for pen fans like us, and I’m planning to fill up my journal soon. It would be a great way to keep record of each pen and ink color that I have. Maybe someday when it’s time to pass on my pens to my nephews and nieces, they can have this journal as a companion of sorts, to help them appreciate the pens not just as writing instruments but as little things that brought me joy at some point in my life.

The Elias Pen and Ink Journal is available at Everything Calligraphy.

Kyo Iro and Kyo No Oto Roundup


Kyo Iro and Kyo No Oto Inks

The past few weeks, I’ve had the pleasure of trying out all the different colors of Kyo Iro and Kyo No Oto. It was really a lot of fun, and while I enjoyed trying all of them out, a few of them really stood out for me as my favorites.

Kyo Iro Soft Snow of Ohara

Kyo-Iro Inks - Soft Snow of Ohara

I really love this blue. I don’t think I have a similar shade of it in my ink collection. It’s a mellow kind of blue that has purple tones. It really pops out of the page for me, I love seeing an entire page written with this ink. Simply lovely.

Kyo Iro Moonlight of Higashiyama

Kyo-Iro Inks - Moonlight of Higashiyama

This one’s really easy to like. It’s a beautiful shade of terracotta, and it stays so vibrant on the page. The shading is so expressive too.

Kyo No Oto Kokeiro

Kyo No Oto Kokeiro

No surprises here, I guess? It’s a light olive green ink that has beautiful shading. It flows a bit on the dry side, but works beautifully with the right pen.

Kyo No Oto Yamabukiiro

Kyo No Oto Yamabukiiro

I am quite surprised that I ended up liking this ink so much. I’m not big on yellow inks at all. In fact, I don’t think I have any yellow inks. This one’s a beautiful, earthy yellow though. You need to see this in person, on paper, to fully appreciate how beautiful it is.

Overall, both lines have really interesting colors. The collection is quite varied and the inks have their own personalities, so to speak. I had such a great time reviewing them, thanks to the wonderful people at Everything Calligraphy for the samples.

Ink Swabs Kyoto Inks

Kyoto inks are available at Everything Calligraphy.

Here’s a roundup of all the Kyoto Inks I have reviewed:

Kyo No Oto Imayouiro


Kyo No Oto Imayouiro

The last Kyo No Oto ink that I will review is this cute pink ink called Imayouiro. It’s an intense pink when wet but it dries to a more mellow, suitably saturated pink. Dark enough to be easily readable, but also light enough to look a bit delicate on paper. It’s not a screaming neon pink color, but something that would look nice with calligraphy or in combination with other darker inks on a page.

The flow is pretty wet on a medium nib. It’s also quite well-behaved. It’s not all over the place, doesn’t feather or bleed through. It dries relatively fast at 15 seconds or so. It’s not water resistant. It’s got beautiful shading, though not really what I would call expressive or with a complex range of colors. It’s a pretty standard, nice-flowing, saturated pink ink. Here are a few close ups of the writing sample.

Kyo No Oto Imayouiro

Kyo No Oto Imayouiro

Kyo No Oto Imayouiro

Kyo No Oto Imayouiro

Kyo No Oto Imayouiro

Kyoto inks are available at Everything Calligraphy.

Here’s a roundup of all the Kyoto Inks I have reviewed:

Review: Kyo No Oto Nurebairo


Kyo No Oto Nurebairo

The next ink I’m reviewing from the Kyo No Oto line of Kyoto Inks is Nurebairo. At first I was a little confused by it because I really thought it’s blue black. Under fluorescent light, it does look like a very dark blue. Under natural light, it’s clearly a black colored ink with blue undertones. The ink feels quite thick to me, so it flows a bit on the dry side. It also has some copper sheen, although the sheen seems equally distributed along the lines that I draw. Much like what happens when the ink doesn’t have expressive shading. For me, the effect is that the ink looks more glossy than sheeny on paper, much like how india ink would look like when dry. Here’s a short clip on the copper-colored sheen on Tomoe River paper. Keep in mind that the sheen of any ink can be seen if you use the right combination of ink, pen, and paper. More absorbent paper and dry-writing nibs most probably won’t show off the sheen-y properties of ink.

The ink dries relatively slow at 25 seconds or so. It’s also not water resistant. This is a nice, rich black if you want something that’s not watery-looking for your everyday writing. It doesn’t show off much shading, though the little shading it has shows a color of dark bluish grey. I know many people like myself who like black ink to be black like tar or jet black. This would be just the right legit black for your legit black ink needs. Here are a few closeups of the writing sample:

Kyo No Oto Nurebairo

Kyo No Oto Nurebairo

Kyo No Oto Nurebairo

Kyo No Oto Nurebairo

Kyo No Oto Nurebairo

Kyo No Oto Nurebairo

Kyoto inks are available at Everything Calligraphy.

Here’s a roundup of all the Kyoto Inks I have reviewed:

Review: Kyo-Iro Flaming Red of Fushimi


Kyo-Iro Flaming Red of Fushimi

Here’s the last of the Kyo-Iro line of Kyoto Inks that I’ve tried. The next inks linked up for review are all Kyo No Oto inks. This one’s called Flaming Red of Fushimi. At first I was surprised because it was neither flaming nor red when wet. The ink’s color got darker as it dried, and under natural light, the red component is much more obvious. It does start out as a cross between pink and peach, like the color of pink guava flesh or four seasons juice. Pink that leans more on the red side. When in a low-light surrounding, the ink looks less-saturated and more pink, but in natural light, it does become a more pronounced shade of red. The color is pretty interesting in both cases. I don’t think I have tried an ink that is similar in hue. It’s eye-catching, to say the least. It’s a moderately saturated ink, so I would recommend that you use it with a medium nib at least, or something that writes wet, so that you can appreciate the character of the ink. The shading is expressive and gorgeous, with shades of peach and dark pink. It flows a bit drier than moderate, though not unpleasantly so. I just feel it’s not as wet as the other Kyo-Iro inks I tried. The drying time is more or less the same, about 15 seconds. It’s not water resistant. Here are a few close up shots of the writing sample.

Kyo-Iro Flaming Red of Fushimi

Kyo-Iro Flaming Red of Fushimi

Kyo-Iro Flaming Red of Fushimi

Kyo-Iro Flaming Red of Fushimi

Kyo-Iro Flaming Red of Fushimi

Kyo-Iro Flaming Red of Fushimi

Kyoto inks are available at Everything Calligraphy.

Here’s a roundup of all the Kyoto Inks I have reviewed: