Review: Robert Oster Blue Water Ice


Robert Oster Blue Water Ice

This past few days, I’ve been using Blue Water Ice in my journal entries. Robert Oster certainly makes eye-catching blue inks. This is a vibrant blue with pink sheen. It’s interesting to look at because the base blue color is light enough and the pink sheen is sheen-y enough for the ink to show a halo around the lines. You can see it on the writing sample above, it’s like the letters have a thin outline around them.

I would recommend using wide nib sizes for this ink for you to truly appreciate the ink’s beauty. I tried using it with a fine nib and the ink comes off as a pale blue. Pretty, but not as pretty as if you use a wider nib, like the one I used here (a cursive italic nib). It’s a saturated ink, but it still shows off a lot of beautiful shading. It’s saturated enough for everyday writing, but it’s not a boring, standard blue. It’s a happy shade of blue that is so vibrant, it pops right out of the page.

It flows wet, and dries about 15-20 seconds (on Tomoe River, with a cursive italic medium nib). It’s always fun to use flow-y inks. Here are a few close up photos of the writing sample.

Robert Oster Blue Water Ice

Robert Oster Blue Water Ice

Robert Oster Blue Water Ice

Robert Oster Blue Water Ice

Robert Oster Blue Water Ice

Robert Oster Blue Water Ice

Robert Oster Blue Water Ice

Check out Everything Calligraphy for Robert Oster Signature Inks.

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Sailor Morita Progear Mini


Sailor Morita Progear Mini (Broad)

The first Sailor pen that I bought was a clear candy, back in 2014 (if I recall correctly). I got another Sailor, a Sapporo Progear Slim last year, and I’m really happy about how the pens write perfectly out of the box. The nib wasn’t soft, but it wrote really smoothly. So I thought I’d get a Morita as well, because I love the color and I enjoy the Sailor pens that I bought so far.

Sailor Morita Progear Mini (Broad)

I was going to get a progear slim again, but I thought I’d try a progear mini this time, and I’m glad I did. This pen is super cute. It’s a little pocket pen that is just a teeny bit longer than a Kaweco Sport.

Sailor Morita Progear Mini (Broad)

When uncapped and posted, they are almost the same size as well, although the end of Sailor’s barrel has threads on it where you can securely screw the cap on. I’m glad they did it this way because it’s not comfortable to hold unposted, and having a place to thread the cap on means that I don’t need to worry about the cap scratching the barrel when I post it. It’s also pretty secure, your hand won’t push the cap off while you write.

Sailor Morita Progear Mini (Broad)

It is about 1.5 cm shorter than a progear slim, and the girth is the same. When capped, the girth is like that of a medium-sized pen, so it’s easy to hold while writing. The length of the section is a bit short (like the progear slim), but it’s the right proportion to the body. Since I hold my pens near the edge of the section anyway, the threads don’t really bother me a lot.

Sailor Morita Progear Mini (Broad)

I really like the color of this pen. It looks like Tiffany blue for me, but after reading about the pen online, it’s called robin’s egg blue. It was made especially for Mr. Morita, of the Morita Pen Shop in Osaka, Japan. The color is said to be based on the ceiling of a cathedral where Mozart performed. I like the combination of robin’s egg blue and rhodium trims.

Sailor Morita Progear Mini (Broad)

Because of the length of the pen, the proprietary Sailor converter doesn’t fit. It uses cartridges instead. I don’t mind it at all, though this might be a deal breaker for people who don’t have the time to refill empty cartridges using a syringe. Here’s a video of the writing sample:

Like I mentioned earlier, the pen just wrote perfectly out of the box. My Sapporo has a medium nib, though being a Japanese medium, it wrote more like a European fine. I chose a B nib this time because I like thicker lines. The Sailor Morita’s B nib writes like a European medium, which is perfect for me. I love it, it glides on paper and has the slightest feedback. It’s really a pleasure to use.

Here are a few more closeups of the different parts of the pen:ย  Continue reading

Review: Robert Oster Plumb Nut


Robert Oster Plumb Nut

A few days ago, I tried out my sample of Robert Oster Plumb Nut. Aside from the little dab of ink on the cap, I didn’t really know what to expect because I’m not sure what a plumb nut is. I used my Sailor Sapporo Progear Slim with a medium nib and (after getting acquainted with the color a bit more) a Lamy Studiio with a 1.5 mm nib. Right off the bat, I like that it’s a pleasant old rose color. It’s a mellow kind of pink, a bit dusky, with a slight hint of purple. It has beautiful deep pink shading, and no sheen. When I first tried it with my Sailor pen, it felt thin, almost watery. It doesn’t bleed or go all over the place, but it felt watery on paper as I wrote, so my nib felt like it’s gliding on the surface of the paper. I reversed my nib to see how it would look like in an xf nib (or maybe closer to a needlepoint) and it flowed quite wet too. I also used it with a 1.5 mm Lamy nib to see how it will hold up with a wider nib.

Robert Oster Plumb Nut

The nib never ran dry, and it showed off the gorgeous characteristics of the ink. Even if the ink’s consistency felt watery, the saturation is not too light. It darkened a bit after drying, but remained a pleasant pop or color on paper. It also dried up pretty quickly at about 10 seconds or so using the medium nib on Tomoe River paper. It’s also not water resistant.

Here are a few close ups of the writing sample:

Robert Oster Plumb Nut

Robert Oster Plumb Nut

Robert Oster Plumb Nut

Robert Oster Plumb Nut

Robert Oster Plumb Nut

Robert Oster Plumb Nut

Robert Oster Plumb Nut

Plumb Nut and other Robert Oster Signature Inks are available at Everything Calligraphy.

Review: Robert Oster Eucalyptus Leaf


Robert Oster Eucalyptus Leaf

Today I’m reviewing Robert Oster Signature Inks Eucalyptus green. It’s a deep green color with a very subtle red undertone. If you’re a green ink lover, this ink is pretty easy to love. At first glance, it reminded me of one of my favorite green inks, De Atramentis Jane Austen, but a closer look shows some differences between the two:

Robert Oster Eucalyptus Leaf

The red undertone of Eucalyptus Leaf (bottom line) gives it a warmer tone. It has more shading, and the light green component of its shading looks beautifully translucent. Of course, shading will depend on the pen that you use as well as paper quality, YMMV.

Eucalyptus Leaf is a wet-flowing ink, and it takes around 20-25 seconds to dry (medium nib, Tomoe River paper). I like that it feels wet but doesn’t bleed and isn’t too wet that it doesn’t show off the shading. It’s just wet enough for the nib to feel like it’s gliding on paper. It stays vibrant even after it dries, which is something I love about Robert Oster inks. This green ink is nicely saturated and is suitable for everyday writing. It’s not water resistant, but if you use it for pen and wash drawings (like the weird-looking Master Oogwey in the writing sample sheet above), it spreads out nicely and shows the red components of the ink.

Here are a few close ups of the writing sample:

Robert Oster Eucalyptus Leaf

Robert Oster Eucalyptus Leaf

Robert Oster Eucalyptus Leaf

Robert Oster Eucalyptus Leaf

Robert Oster Eucalyptus Leaf

Robert Oster Signature Inks are exclusively distributed in the Philippines by Everything Calligraphy.

Dream Catcher 2


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A friend of mine asked if he could have the first dream catcher painting I did, but I couldn’t give it to him so I promised I would just make him a new one. Today I finally had the time to sit down and work on it. It was a pretty interesting experience, trying to recreate a piece. It resulted to different paintings, of course, I couldn’t even recreate the number of loops in the original dream catcher, but I like them both. They’re about the same subject but they’re different.

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Here’s a side by side comparison of the two. The original one on the left is in a clear folder, the light is reflecting on the plastic a bit. I like them both. Makes me want to paint a series. Maybe someday. ๐Ÿ™‚

Beauty and the Beast


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Here’s a journal entry I wrote a couple of days ago about the Beauty and the Beast adaptation this year. I’ve been meaning to write about this but only got around to it now. I was honestly not too excited about the movie because I don’t really like the story of Beauty and the Beast. I found the animated movie to be a bit weird, but then again I didn’t like fairy tales even as a child. The animated movie didn’t make much sense to me because it seemed the basis for their “true love” was too shallow.

The movie was quite the surprise because the core of the story stuck to the traditional fairy tale plot, but the addition of Belle and Beast’s back stories made the entire thing about their “love” quite plausible. There were a lot of things about this adaptation that I liked. One is how Belle didn’t feel like she didn’t fit in to the little town’s “provincial life” not just because she’s like the odd girl out, but also because there’s a whole episode in her life that her father didn’t want to tell her about. This film’s Belle was strong, intelligent, compassionate, intellectually curious. She was also an outsider who was keenly aware of the majority of the town’s rejection of her “strangeness”. Her relationship with Beast progressed from resentment to friendship gradually, by getting to know him and his story.

Unlike the animated film where it’s almost taken for granted that it’s Belle’s affection Beast must win, the 2017 adaptation is more balanced. Both Belle and Beast needed to learn how to love each other in order for the curse to be broken. Beast didn’t automatically fall in love with Belle just because she was beautiful. He had to grow into it too.

Both found common ground with their being rejected because of how different they are from other people, both also found another common ground, and it’s probably the ย best thing you can base a friendship on–a meeting of the minds. I loved those scenes where they read together. It reminded me of when my husband and I haven’t even started to go out yet. Our friendship took on a different level when we discovered that we both liked to read. We would read the same book and then spend hours talking about it, among other things. This meeting of the minds gives each other an open door, an invitation to step in and get to know each other in a deeper sense. Until now, my husband and I still love going somewhere quiet so we can sit together and read our books, and talk, and talk some more.

That kind of friendship is fertile ground for love. That kind of story goes beyond the superficiality of being beautiful or beastly.

There are a lot of other things I loved about the movie, but this part about them discovering kindred spirits in each other is my favorite. ๐Ÿ™‚

Review: Robert Oster Marrone Mustard


Robert Oster Marrone Mustard

I was thinking about which Robert Oster ink to review next and I decided to do Marrone Mustard. I was really expecting something more on the yellow side, as in the commercial mustard that we commonly find in the condiments section of the grocery store. When I put my pen on paper, though, I was pleasantly surprised to see that it’s predominantly brown. A quick Google search on the word Marrone informed me that it’s Italian for brown. The Marrone Mustard ink is a brown mustard color, which is a nice golden brown. It’s pretty striking, especially because it has such expressive shading.

Robert Oster Marrone Mustard

It looks gorgeous on paper, especially in person. The shades of the ink ranges from a soft mustard yellow to a warm brown. I suggest you use a wet medium nib so you can appreciate the shading and the complexity of the color even more. It reminds me of the color of leaves turning. The ink grows a little bit darker a few hours after it dries up on paper. I’ve tried it on my journal which has ivory colored Tomoe River paper and my oh my, it’s gorgeous.

The flow is almost moderate but a tiny bit on the dry side. It’s also not very water resistant, making it a nice ink to use for pen and wash drawings. The water brings out more of the reddish component of the brown tones, though. The wash looks more orange-y than brown or yellow.

Here are a few close ups of the writing samples:

Robert Oster Marrone Mustard

Robert Oster Marrone Mustard

Robert Oster Marrone Mustard

Robert Oster Marrone Mustard

Robert Oster Marrone Mustard

Robert Oster Marrone Mustard

Robert Oster Marrone Mustard

Overall, I find this ink very, very beautiful. I must add it to my personal collection. It’s the kind of ink I want to write many letters and journal entries with.

Robert Oster inks are exclusively distributed in the Philippines by Everything Calligraphy.