Review: Birmingham Inks – Andy Warhol – Pop Art Purple


Here’s another Birmingham ink that I tried this week. It’s called Andy Warhol (Pop Art Purple). I was expecting a bold, loud, violently violet color but it turned out to be quite a demure and dusky purple color.

Birmingham Inks - Andy Warhol - Pop Art Purple

At first it looks very similar to Diamine Bilberry when wet, but it gets darker as it dries. After it’s completely dry, it looks more like blue violet. It’s very subdued and nicely saturated. While it’s not exactly a screaming purple ink, it’s something you can use for daily writing, without calling too much attention to it. I would put the flow at dry to moderate, depending on the nib you’re using. It dries up pretty fast, considering that I used a stub nib for this writing sample (obviously, I need to clean my other pens soon, haha). It’s not waterproof but does leave a faint purple line behind. Overall, it does look a bit flat, but it’s something you can use for work or class notes if you want a purple ink that, at first glance, can pass as dark blue. Here are a few close ups of the writing sample.

Birmingham Inks - Andy Warhol - Pop Art Purple

Birmingham Inks - Andy Warhol - Pop Art Purple

Birmingham Inks - Andy Warhol - Pop Art Purple

Birmingham Inks - Andy Warhol - Pop Art Purple

Birmingham Inks - Andy Warhol - Pop Art Purple

Birmingham Inks - Andy Warhol - Pop Art Purple

Birmingham Inks are available at Everything Calligraphy.

Review: Birmingham Inks Point Park – Fountain Turquoise


Finally, I found time to post this review. I really enjoyed trying out this ink. I’m afraid the photos didn’t really do justice on how pretty this ink is. It’s really better to enjoy it in person. Anyway, I’ll try my best.

Birmingham Inks - Point Park - Fountain Turquoise

Fountain Turquoise is quite a pretty ink. It kind of reminds me of Pilot Iroshizuku SyoRo when it dries, without the sheen. It’s a simpler version of it, I think. A nice blue-green color that tilts just a little bit towards the green side of the spectrum. It’s sufficiently saturated to make it suitable for daily writing, even for work-related notes, but the color is ambiguous enough to give you pause and wonder about it. I love the flow as well, it’s a moderate to wet-flowing ink. It dries relatively fast at 15-20 seconds, without noticeable feathering. It’s a head-turner, for me. It’s not water-resistant, though it leaves behind a faint, purplish line. It washes away pretty easily. Here are a few close ups of the writing sample.

Birmingham Inks - Point Park - Fountain Turquoise

Birmingham Inks - Point Park - Fountain Turquoise

Birmingham Inks - Point Park - Fountain Turquoise

Birmingham Inks - Point Park - Fountain Turquoise

Birmingham Inks - Point Park - Fountain Turquoise

Birmingham Inks - Point Park - Fountain Turquoise

Birmingham Inks are available exclusively at Everything Calligraphy.

DangerShrooms


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After a couple of paintings on edible mushrooms, I made a series for poisonous ones. They’re really interesting, I wish I had more time to study and explore them, but it was a busy week at work. Looks like poisonous mushrooms have more interesting, vibrant colors than edible ones. ^_^

Colors used: (Sennelier) Naples Yellow Deep, Venetian Red, Yellow Ochre, Burnt Sienna, Raw Umber, Alizarin Crimson, Phthalocyanine Blue, Forest Green, Phthalo Green, Vert Sapin Forest Green, French Vermillion, Payne’s Grey (Artnebulaph.com)

Paper: Global Art Materials Travelogue Watercolor Journal (Stationer Extraordinaire)

Ramami!


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Last night my husband and I hung out and had dinner with a couple of good friends. There’s a spate of budget ramen carts and stalls all over the south and one of them happened to pop up beside our favorite shawarma place. It was okay, though a bit confusing to the tastebuds because it’s like a cross between a Japanese ramen and Chinese noodle soup. Haha. The shawarma was on point, though. We had dessert and coffee at home. After a long week, it’s a relief to hang out with friends who are low-key and can enjoy simple pleasures.

On a side note, I used my new cat’s tongue brush for this painting. It’s so much fun to use! I thought I’d only use it for botanical paintings but it’s a very versatile brush. I was able to drop by ArtNebulaPh at BF Homes yesterday and after playing with a whole lotta brushes, decided on a Raphael cat’s tongue (#6) and an Isabey blue squirrel round mop (3/0). Really great brushes, these two. They can hold a point very well. I also got a few Sennelier halfpans to complete my travel palette.

Overall, a fun day! ^_^

Review: Birmingham Inks Smithfield St. Bridge – Truss Blue


Here’s another blue Birmingham Ink that I’ve been using for the past few days. It’s Smithfield St. Bridge (Truss Blue). This is another dark blue ink, which looks conservative and behaves pretty well.

Birmingham Inks - Smithfield St. Bridge - Truss Blue

It’s a bit dark when wet, reminds me of the color of Tsuki-yo, but it seems to get a bit lighter as it dries. I used a Waterman Gentleman with a fine nib for this writing sample. It’s a wet, European fine nib, though. I’m very much pleased that the ink flowed so well, even in a fine nib. The drying time is a little over 5 seconds, and the flow is moderate to wet. I like that it’s a very well-behaved ink, it doesn’t feather a lot and it doesn’t clog up even if I don’t use the pen for a few days. Even with a fine nib, I love that it still shows beautiful shading.

The color is dark blue, and it’s not a crazy blue with sheen or anything like that. It’s a straight up blue that’s nicely saturated and conservative-looking enough for you to use even at work. You probably can’t use sheen-y, shimmer-y inks for official documents, but this kind of blue can be a staple for everyday writing.

It’s not water-resistant, though it leaves behind a faint but noticeable purple line. Here are a few close ups of the writing sample:

Birmingham Inks - Smithfield St. Bridge - Truss Blue

Birmingham Inks - Smithfield St. Bridge - Truss Blue

Birmingham Inks - Smithfield St. Bridge - Truss Blue

Birmingham Inks - Smithfield St. Bridge - Truss Blue

Birmingham Inks - Smithfield St. Bridge - Truss Blue

Birmingham Inks - Smithfield St. Bridge - Truss Blue

Birmingham Inks - Smithfield St. Bridge - Truss Blue

Birmingham inks are available at Everything Calligraphy.

Global Art Materials Travelogue Watercolor Journal


Watercolor is a relatively new fascination for me. This phase is always fun because everything is new. There’s nothing like the joy of discovering new watercolor paints, brushes, and paper. I like to try out a lot of brands until I find something I can settle for consistently (much like how I went through a crazy phase of trying out every fountain pen-friendly paper before I settled for Tomoe River). I thought I’d write about some paper discoveries so I can go back and revisit them someday too.

I found the Global Art Materials Travelogue Watercolor Journal at the website of Stationer Extraordinaire while checking out Kaweco pens. It’s bigger than Moleskine’s watercolor journal and has a nice cover. I thought I’d try it out.

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The journal is 8.25 x 8.25 inches in size and has 30 leaves (60 pages) of acid-free, 200gsm cold-pressed paper. It’s square and it lies down flat as a rectangle. I really like that it lays down flat so easily, and the hard cover makes it even more convenient to use when sketching outdoors. The paper is 200gsm cold pressed paper. There’s no information about cotton content but I’m pretty sure it has very little cotton content in it. The paper is a bit similar to Moleskine’s watercolor journal, except it has more texture. The paper can handle several layers of light washes, though it warps a little bit. It’s not too bad, though. I think it’s better suited to ink and wash paintings where there’s not too much layering involved.

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I like how the paper is textured, it looks really nice after the paint dries. It also takes fountain pen inks pretty well. I can write my journal entries after painting, or use fountain pen inks for drawing, and there’s no feathering as it dries. This journal’s pretty new so I haven’t finished too many pages yet. Here are a few.

Global Art Materials Travelogue Watercolor Journal

Global Art Materials Travelogue Watercolor Journal

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Here are a few closeup photos, hopefully it shows the texture of the paper.

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Overall, I’m enjoying it a lot. It’s a great watercolor journal to take with you outdoors. The linen hard cover is also really pretty and functional.

Review: Birmingham Inks – Andrew Carnegie – Steel Blue


Here’s another Birmingham Ink that I’ve been playing with for the past few weeks. It’s Andrew Carnegie Steel Blue. I must admit I was surprised to see a dark blue instead of a light, icy blue, but a quick research in Google corrected my perception of the color.

Birmingham Inks - Andrew Carnegie - Steel Blue

The ink is a dark blue-grey while wet, but it dries to an interesting color of dark blue with a greenish tint. Like dark turquoise. Of all the Birmingham Inks I tried, so far this is more flow-y. I would put the flow at a moderate to wet. It take a bit longer to dry too, about 25 seconds or more, depending on how wet the nib is and the quality of paper. For this review, I used a Pelikan M200 with a medium nib and tomoe river white paper. It’s not waterproof or water resistant, though it leaves noticeable blue lines behind. The high saturation of the ink makes shading less noticeable, except if you’re using fine nibs. It reminds me of Sailor Miruai, except it’s on the bluer side. Here are a few close ups of the ink’s writing sample:

Birmingham Inks - Andrew Carnegie - Steel Blue

Birmingham Inks - Andrew Carnegie - Steel Blue

Birmingham Inks - Andrew Carnegie - Steel Blue

Birmingham Inks - Andrew Carnegie - Steel Blue

Birmingham Inks - Andrew Carnegie - Steel Blue

Birmingham Inks - Andrew Carnegie - Steel Blue

Overall, it’s a nice dark blue ink. The greenish tint makes it an interesting variation on blue-black. I also like the flow a lot.

Birmingham Inks are available at Everything Calligraphy.